Feeling Better is Not all its Cracked up to Be

Symptom Suppression (Feeling Better) is Not Health Expression (Feeling More)! 

We’re not Feeling Better, We’re Feel Less.  This day and age we define our health by how we feel.  What makes sense if we catch a cold and feel lousy?  To haphazardly continue on with the day after taking a drug like Sudafed or NyQuil.  After the medication wears off and you start to feel bad again then you take another.  You will repeat this process, sometimes for weeks, until you start to feel better.  What makes sense for a headache?  To continue on with your day after taking an aspirin or Tylenol.  “It works,” we say, “The aspirin cured my headache!”  But how did it do this?  However, what was the process that had to occur for the aspirin or Tylenol to work?

When we opt for covering up the true source of illness and disease…

We Really Don’t Feel Better, We Actually Feel Less.

No matter what the symptom, when we take a drug we are suppressing the brain and it begins to numb it and becomes desensitized.  The cause of the organ to malfunction has not been corrected once it has been removed, only the effect.  We begin to think that we feel better but in reality nothing has changed.   We have merely  suppressed signals to the brain and brainstem, therefore, in reality one really does begin to feel less.

Do you have an ovarian cyst?  We must remove the ovaries.  Tonsillitis?  Let’s take them out!  How about your gallbladder issues?  See ya!  You don’t really need it anyway.  While we are at it lets remove the appendix and the breast preventatively just in case there may be a problem some day.  Step back for a moment and look at the picture being painted then ask yourself, “Is this 21st century healthcare?”  Consequently, doesn’t it seem like this way of health should be comparable with bloodletting?

We are indoctrinated in our society to think of health as the absence of symptoms.  Henceforth, if we are not sick, we must be healthy.  If all of our tests are normal then we must be fit as a fiddle, right as rain, and healthy as a horse.  Furthermore, there is nothing more for us to do if we pass our tests.

If symptoms are no longer indicative of our overall health and well-being, then what is the measure we use to find a path to greater health? 

The following questionnaire will provide some insights.  Check it out!  You might be surprised at some of your answers.

Mental clarity – how clear are your thoughts throughout the day?

How well can you make decisions and come to conclusions about ideas and events in your day?  Do you feel foggy?

Do I get intuitive hits about my life and its course of action?

Am I focusing on the negative, the bad, and the fear of all the things that could happen to me?

Do I feel persuaded by the media and others around me to act or feel a certain way?

Is there a roller coaster of emotions throughout the day or am I calm, cool, collected?

Does fear trigger a response of emotion or conscious thought?

Am I a pessimist or optimist?

Do new ideas and events inspire me and get me excited for my next achievement?

Is inspiration my leading feeling trait?

Do I suffer from INtention deficit disorder?  Which means, Do I have an intention for my life?

Am I happy?  With my life?  And all it has presented up to this point?

Is there an inner sense of “it’s ok”?

How often are you in a state of gratitude?

Is there a trust built around the daily events in life or am I worried about them?

These questions ultimately give way to our health: physically, mentally, and spiritually.  Health is an inner sense of well-being and an ability of the body to respond and ADAPT.  So….. How healthy are you?

Can’t Sleep? 6 Reasons – Insomnia Part 1

Insomnia
Insomnia

6 Reasons You Aren’t Sleeping – Insomnia Part 1:

Support your body’s natural rhythms
Getting in sync with your body’s natural sleep-wake cycle, or circadian rhythm, is one of the most important strategies for achieving good sleep and combating insomnia. If you keep a regular sleep schedule—going to bed and getting up at the same time each day—you will feel much more refreshed and energized than if you sleep the same number of hours at different times. This holds true even if you alter your sleep schedule by only an hour or two. Consistency is vitally important to conquering insomnia.

  • Try to go to sleep and get up at the same time every day. Sticking to a consistent sleep-wake schedule helps set your body’s internal clock and optimize the quality of your sleep. Start by setting a realistic bedtime that will work with your lifestyle. Choose a time when you normally feel tired, so that you don’t toss and turn. If you’re getting enough sleep, you should wake up naturally without an alarm. If you need an alarm clock to wake up on time, you may need to set an earlier bedtime.
  • Avoid sleeping in—even on weekends or nights you’ve stayed up late. It can be tempting to sleep in on weekends, but even a couple hour difference in wake time disrupts your internal clock. The more your weekend/weekday sleep schedules differ, the worse the jetlag-like symptoms you’ll experience. If you need to make up for a late night, opt for a daytime nap rather than sleeping in. This strategy allows you to pay off your sleep debt without disturbing your natural sleep-wake rhythm, which often backfires in insomnia and other sleep disorders and throws you off for days.
  • Be smart about napping. As mentioned above, napping is a good way to recharge and make up for lost sleep hours. But if you tend to have trouble falling asleep or staying asleep throughout the night, napping can make things worse. If insomnia is a problem for you, consider eliminating naps altogether or limiting them to 20 minutes (natural rhythm) in the early afternoon around 1-2 pm.
  • Fight after-dinner drowsiness. If you find yourself getting sleepy way before your bedtime, get off the couch and do something mildly stimulating to avoid falling asleep, such as washing the dishes, calling a friend, or getting clothes ready for the next day. If you give in to the drowsiness, you may wake up later in the night and have trouble getting back to sleep.
  • Avoid Blue Light Time before bed.  Blue light stimulates the brain and does not allow it to settle down before bed.  Insomnia and sleep problems are worsened when the brain is exposed to blue light 1 hour before bedtime.  Opt for a book to read rather that looking at your phone, T.V., or other screens which transmit blue light, contribute to brain stimulation, and lack of restful sleep.
  • Get your nervous system checked.  Did you know that pressure in the upper neck where the brain stem sets can affect your sleep?  If the Atlas bone is out of alignment it may be putting pressure on the brain stem causing congestion of the brain itself.  Symptoms may include insomnia, chronic tiredness and fatigue, fuzzy thinking, moodiness, forgetfulness even memory loss.

 

Call us Today to set up your free consultation and find out if Upper Cervical Care can help you!  970.259.6803 or CLICK HERE to schedule your free consultation!